Style Treatment Series: Dance Craze 1920s


So what then was the jazz age?   Downloadable Flapper Lesson Plan

book_cover                                                                                              Like these lessons? Global Citizens 

The 1920s Jazz Age was described with superlatives such as golden and roaring.  Until the crash came there was opulence and partying and JAZZ.   After The Great War old perceived social conventions broke down and there was a revolution of thought, behaviour and style.

By style we mean of music, dance, dress standards and behaviour.  It was a time of freedom and experimentation and this blatant rebellion was met with shock, and disbelief.

Louise_Brooks_ggbain_32453u_crop

This new rebellious alternate generation, embraced whole heartedly what came to be called Jazz. Young men and women engaged with the new music by improvising outlandish dances, .which alienated them from the older generation The young blamed the older generation for the insanity and senselessness of the First World War.  The CharlestonOne Step and Black Bottom signalled the battle lines between the young and the old.   The most famous jazzmen were Louis Armstrong,  Fats Waller and Benny Goodman.

The combination of the new music, new dances and new fashions outraged many.  It seems that contentious women of the time were called Flappers!

In the Roaring Twenties, before the great crash, people would do crazy things for fun, you can see this from the old movie footage featured above.  Marathon dances went on until everybody was exhausted.

Please see Downloadable Flapper Lesson Plan

Resources:

Advertisements

Love to Know What You Think?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s